Ring of Fire News

Icon

What's up with the biggest thing happening in mining in NW Ontario?

#RingOfFire (#RoF) News – April 20, 2016

  • The latest Chinese #RoF moves Engineers from China recently visited the Ring of Fire in northern Ontario to assess the potential of building a $2-billion railway line, a proponent behind developing minerals in the area said … Frank Smeenk, CEO of Toronto-based mineral exploration company KWG Resources, said the rail line is crucial for the extraction of nickel, chromite, copper and platinum from the massive deposits. He said a team of engineers from a subsidiary of the state-owned China Railway Construction Corp. surveyed a proposed 328-kilometre route last week as part of detailed engineering work before they advance toward a final investment decision. “They had to visit the route, to see it with their own eyes,” said Smeenk. Smeenk said roads would also have to be built to construct the mine and railway. Those roads would also link several remote northern communities, and they should be built, regardless of whether the mine proceeds, he said …” – more on the Chinese work under way here (Globe & Mail), here (CBC.ca), here (tbnewswatch.com) and here (Timmins Today)
  • More PM Trudeau on the #RoF from his recent northern Ontario drop-bythis from CBC.ca: “… Trudeau’s answers were vague. “We’re still talking with them about how the federal government can best be an active partner in this and that’s what we’re going to do,” he said. “We’re not at the announcement phase yet. We are having discussions with our partners right now.” “
  • Another #RoF PM-ism from the drop-by, via the Chronicle-Journal: “… “It continues to be something we’re working on with the province,” said Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, while in Thunder Bay … “It is normal and expected that the federal government should be a partner in developing large-scale projects like this,” he said …”
  • More PM-isms, via tbnewswatch.com: “… Trudeau said his federal Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr recently met with Ontario Northern Development and Mines Minister Michael Gravelle where they discussed the development. “It continues to be something we’re working on with the province. Obviously the province has the lead on it but we’ve expressed very clearly a number of times we’re willing to be a partner and that’s what we’re engaging with the provincial government on a regular basis,” he said …”
  • Two Sudbury-area Liberal MPs pledge to keep fighting the #RoF fight “Innovation and infrastructure spending are keys to rebuilding Canada’s – and Sudbury’s – economy, the region’s two Liberals MPs said … Sudbury MP Paul Lefebvre and Nickel Belt MP Marc Serre made the comments while speaking at an event presented by Laurentian University and the Greater Sudbury Chamber of Commerce … Both MPs said Ottawa is committed to the Ring of Fire, a mineral rich area located in northwestern Ontario. They said the government needs to focus on both the infrastructure around the Ring of Fire and the First Nations living within it. Developing road and railway links is key, they said. “We’re investing in First Nation education, health and infrastructure. That is the door into the Ring of Fire,” said Lefebvre. He also said the participation of First Nations is absolutely key in moving the project forward …”
  • KWG continues to raise money for their work “KWG Resources Inc. has received subscriptions to complete the $1.5 million private placement of units previously announced, including $0.6 million in settlement of amounts payable to directors, officers, employees and consultants … The proceeds will be used to pay the initial costs of the feasibility study to be undertaken by China Railway First Survey & Design Institute Group Co., Ltd. and for working capital …”
  • Meanwhile, Noront shares its latest (exploration and financials) as well “… The Company is progressively and systematically exploring the favourable footwall contact that hosts the Eagle’s Nest nickel-copper-platinum-palladium deposit and the showings known as Blue Jay and Eagle Two … A program is also being proposed over Project Area 5, known as the Big Daddy property, now held by Noront (70%) and KWG (30%). Similar to the Black Thor property, the favourable footwall contact remains virtually unexplored as the target of previous drilling focused on chromite resources higher up in the ultramafic sill. This latest round of geophysical test work will be conducted over the next six months and will be supported by local First Nations workers employed as line cutters, geophysical helpers and cooks … The Company issued 1,403,273 common shares at a deemed issue price of $0.3387 per share in satisfaction of legal advisory fees in relation to the previously announced financing of the purchase of the Cliffs Chromite Assets which closed on April 28, 2015 … In addition, the Company’s Board of Directors has granted the option to acquire an aggregate of 500,000 common shares to new employees with an exercise price of $0.33 per common share …”
  • Point … What Ontario needs to unlock Ring of Fire’s mineral wealth is a Marshall Plan … If the Trudeau government worked in conjunction with Ontario and adopted something akin to a “Marshall Plan” — the name of the American initiative to rebuild war-torn Europe after the Second World War — to develop and modernize infrastructure in the isolated northwest, it would kill two birds with one stone …”
  • … and counterpoint (attributed to the Chief of Eabametoong First Nation): “… Is a Marshall Plan needed? No. Rather, our First Nations and Ontario need to collaborate on a new, long-term vision of human and environmental life that can incorporate wise industrial development. Let’s work together on that … Am I, or the First Nation that I represent, categorically against development? No. However, we will not be bought off. We are interested in the development of meaningful, relationship-based partnerships that could lead to wise management of resources …”
  • Think tank report: lessons to be learned from the past? “The ongoing saga to develop the Ring of Fire could — and perhaps should — draw lessons from the past, states a new report from the Northern Policy Institute. In the report From Resource to Revenue: Dryden Mill Lessons for the Ring of Fire, Laurentian University history professor Mark Kuhlberg draws comparisons between the Ring of Fire and the early history of the pulp and paper mill in Dryden. “Following the discovery of copper-nickel and chromite deposits in the Ring of Fire nearly a decade ago, there has been much talk about the enormous potential for economic development represented by this untapped resource,” Kuhlberg wrote. “Eight years later, however, many are questioning why so little progress has been made and some are becoming increasingly frustrated with the pace of development.” …”

 

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Ring of Fire News – 21 Nov 11

  • More on Noront’s Eagle’s Nest project entering the Environmental Assessment fray.  “As the controversy over the environmental study of a proposed Ring of Fire mine drags on, another proposed mine in the Ring of Fire has started a similar environmental assessment process.  The environmental assessment for Noront Resources’ proposed Eagles Nest mine kicked off Nov. 15 with the opening of a 30-day public comment period.  The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (CEAA) decided to do a comprehensive study, the same process chosen for Cliffs Natural Resources’ proposed chromite mine.  CEAA spokesperson Celine Legault said that the agency determined there was no need for the Noront project to be subjected to a more intensive Joint Review Panel (JRP) assessment.  “At any time during the study the (federal) minister of environment can refer the assessment to a Joint Review Panel,” Legault said.  He said the decision to refer the project to a JRP would be based on the project having “likely, significant adverse effects” and “major public concerns.”  A JRP review would involve a panel of independent experts overseeing the review, and include community meetings where oral testimonies and concerns could be raised.  In contrast, a comprehensive study is done by the CEAA itself. In a comprehensive study only written submissions are accepted.  The Noront comprehensive study will involve three public comment periods where any member of the public can submit a written concern to the CEAA, Legault said. The first public comment period has a deadline of Dec. 16.  During the second public comment period meetings will be held in affected Aboriginal communities, Legault said.  She added that consultation with Aboriginal groups has been ongoing since Noront submitted its project description in the spring of 2011….”  Source more
  • Some editorial comment on the process and how it handles big projects.  “TWO LARGE resource development proposals in this country highlight the difficulties in balancing economic opportunity with environmental protection. The addition of economic uncertainty and cultural considerations makes this balancing act even tougher. Here in the Northwest, the proposal to develop the huge Ring of Fire chromite project is the subject of dispute over what form of environmental assessment is suitable. A comprehensive study of Cliffs Natural Resources’ proposal, by the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency, is already under way. First Nations in the James Bay Lowlands withdrew their support of the project when the federal government opted not to conduct a higher-level joint review panel EA. Matawa First Nations claims the comprehensive study EA provides “no realistic opportunity for First Nations to participate.” It says the current process will fast track the EA process for government and Cliffs, but put First Nation communities and their lands at serious risk …. The comprehensive study is one of three types of environmental assessments. It tends to be geared to large projects with the potential for major adverse environmental effects. CEAA spokesman Celine Legault said the study could widen to a joint review panel if the federal environment minister deems there is sufficient public concern or considerable environmental impacts that can’t be mitigated …. Timing is important for a development of this size and delays can threaten the project ….” Source
  • Has Cliffs already chosen a site for its smelter?  “…. Cliff’s Natural Resources has issued an update on The Ring of Fire. That October Update states that the Ferrochrome Production Facility will be in Sudbury. “Refining the concentrate will occur at the Ferrochrome Production Facility located for the Base Case on privately owned lands near Capreol within a rural area of the City of Greater Sudbury. The size of the site will be approximately 1.5 km by 1 km. The site is currently designated as “Rural”, allowing a variety of land uses, especially those that provide rural economic benefits that are balanced with protection of the natural environment and the agricultural resource base”. “Infrastructure and services will be required to support construction and operation of the Ferrochrome Production Facility. It is estimated that 350-450 people will work at the site during construction and 350-450 during operations. These workers will commute daily to the site from the surrounding area. The availability of skilled labour is a significant consideration in selecting the location of the Ferrochrome Production Facility ….”  Source Cliffs presentation (PDF)
  • If we believe a Cliffs spokesperson speaking at a Sudbury open house, no they haven’t (at least as of 15 Nov 11, anyway).  “…. Dave Cartella, general manager of global environmental affairs and counsel with Cliffs Natural Resources Inc., said a final decision on where the chromite processing facility will be located has not yet been made. The company has been using Capreol as its “base case” for planning purposes. “(Capreol) does meet all of our basic needs,” Cartella said. “We’re just not ready to make a decision yet.”  Source
  • Thunder Bay and Fort William First Nation make the case to Cliffs for a smelter in Thunder Bay.  “Thunder Bay mayor Keith Hobbs was all smiles Wednesday night when he stepped off the chartered plane that took him and six others to Cleveland, Ohio. He said the pitch the delegation made to Cliffs Natural Resources to build its chromite smelter in the northwest was well-received. “It went very well, we had a great presentation,” he said, noting that the presentation was months in the making. Fort William First Nation Chief Peter Collins was part of the delegation. Hobbs said he thinks Thunder Bay residents are already on board. “Well, there were over 350 people at the open house that Cliff’s put on here, and from what they told us there weren’t too many negative comments at all,” he said. “People want work, and they want to be working in Thunder Bay.” Hobbs said he asks people about the smelter on his walkabouts, and gets positive feedback. George Stevenson is one Thunder Bay resident who supports bringing a smelter to the area. “It’ll be a positive for our community and for the region,” he said. “It could mean a lot of machine shop work in Thunder Bay; it could mean a lot of the fellas getting employment out at the Ring of Fire.” …. Other people were more cautious. Pat Hovi said she has some questions. “I think we want to know whether it’s going to increase employment opportunities for the people in Thunder Bay, or whether there’s an environmental issue we need to know about as well. Those are my concerns.” Hobbs said consultation with the public will be Cliffs’ responsibility, once it chooses the location for the smelter ….”  Sourcemore more
  • Greenstone makes the case to Cliffs for a smelter in Greenstone.  “In Cleveland (16 Nov 11), senior management of Cliffs Natural Resources hosted a multi-hour meeting with a delegation from the Municipality of Greenstone. The focus of the wide ranging discussion was the potential for siting a ferrochrome refinery at Exton Siding (between Nakina and the Aroland First Nation). Greenstone Mayor Renald (Ron) Beaulieu observed, “I was pleased and impressed with the responsiveness and attention our submission received from the Cliffs representatives. They asked some tough but important and insightful questions. Clearly they have been giving a lot of consideration to the benefits of the Exton site.” The Greenstone presentation in Cleveland is an updated version of the “North West Kick- Start” plan released at a media conference in Thunder Bay earlier in the fall. However, the submission has been upgraded with more detailed information and maps related to electricity supply. The Greenstone delegation made similar presentations to officials at Queen’s Park before going to Cleveland. The Mayor commented, “I am very pleased with the quality of the case the Greenstone delegation made in Cleveland. Residents of Greenstone and throughout the Region should be confident that we advanced important points in favour of Greenstone being the site for the ferrochrome refinery. The points made were related to sustainability, economics, electricity supply, First Nations relations and support.” The Mayor continued, “We also talked about the Greenstone mining and exploration legacy and its strategic location as a labour source for workers in all facets of the planned chromite operation.” Charles Fox, a former Grand Chief of the Nishnawbe Aski Nation carefully outlined the important relationship that Greenstone has with local First Nations, and the overarching importance of the Matawa First Nations cooperation to the success of the project ….”  Source alternate download site for news release (PDF) – Chronicle-Journal coverage (PDF)
  • Editorial comparing, contrasting Thunder Bay’s, Greenstone’s approaches.  “…. Both communities stressed the importance of their alliance with First Nations. But while Hobbs and other Thunder Bay leaders travelled to Cleveland with Fort William First Nation Chief Peter Collins, the Greenstone delegation did not include a representative from Matawa First Nations with member communities closest to the Black Thor chromite deposit. Matawa recently withdrew its support for the project in a dispute over environmental review. Greenstone instead met Cliffs with Charles Fox, a former grand chief of the Nishnawbe Aski Nation which includes Matawa. As such, Fox could be signalling he may be able to help get Matawa back on side. …. One big plus for Thunder Bay is the existence of its Ontario power plant which produces just the right amount of electricity needed to power the electric arc furnaces that will process the chromite ore. Central to a longstanding Northwest argument for a homegrown power rate is the fact more power is produced here than is needed. Ontario’s plans to modernize its power grid could easily accommodate the electricity needs of the region and the processor. One final nugget: As Hobbs and Collins peered out the window of their flight home Wednesday, they agreed vacant land on Mission Island next to the power plant would be the perfect place for Cliffs to build is processor.”  Source
  • On that bit in green above, could this be what was being discussed behind closed doors at Thunder Bay City Hall on August 15th?
  • On that bit in red above, let’s also remember that Greenstone & Aroland First Nation hired Fox late last year as a consultant – from a November 2010 Municipality of Greenstone resolution:  “…. be it resolved that Charles Fox Consulting be engaged to provide services to assist with the work as herein delineated, and for the development of agreements with other First Nations in the Ring of Fire, to a limit of $60,000. Any expenditures for such work in excess to this amount will require Council approval. That Council approve funding applications to NOHFC and to FedNor to assist with the cost of developing and implementing work as set out in the Memorandum of Understanding between Aroland First Nation and the Municipality”  Source
  • Column:  No reason why Thunder Bay shouldn’t be to mining what Fort MacMurray is to oil.  “Alberta is seen as Canada’s energy capital. The massive oil, natural gas, and oil sands in Alberta and Saskatchewan are fueling the massive economic growth across the west. Calgary is the brains in the energy sector, and Edmonton and Fort MacMurray are the muscle. There is, should we here in Northwestern Ontario take this as a model, for a similar one for Thunder Bay, Sudbury, and Greenstone with reference to the mining opportunties in The Ring of Fire. Thunder Bay should be the base where important decisions are made on mining in Northwestern Ontario. As well our city can be where the research and analysis can be completed. Additionally, for Northern Ontario and beyond, Thunder Bay can be the destination for sample inspection, analytical testing, and advisory services for the minerals, exploration, and mining industries. We would likely within a short period of time develop a global network of state-of-the-art laboratories. Sudbury can be the processing site for the ferrochrome processor. Greenstone can serve, in conjunction with Thunder Bay as the distribution point for materials needed onsite in the mines. Such a move fits in tightly with Thunder Bay’s Strategic Plan. While the Strat Plan says we will aggressively pursue the chromite processor, more importantly in the long term it says, “We will grow and attract more technology and knowledge-based/research companies”. Our strategic plan also states Thunder Bay will “Pursue the development of a Mining Centre of Excellence in conjunction with the private sector, training and educational institutions such and Lakehead University and Confederation College, and urban and regional Aboriginal organizations.” ….”  Source
  • Sudbury’s Greens join the call for a joint environmental assessment of the Cliffs project – this from a letter from the Party’s Sudbury CEO to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency:  “…. I am frustrated that the CEAA has chosen to assess Cliffs Chromite project as a single project, disconnected from the reality of development proposals on the ground in the Ring of Fire. If ever there was an area of proposed development for which a Joint Assessment should be used by the CEAA, clearly Northwestern Ontario’s remote Ring of Fire fits the bill, as development is to be in an isolated, geographically confined area, which because of its ecology, is sensitive in nature. The Ring of Fire is located within the habitat area of Canada’s iconic woodland caribou, an endangered species which is very skittish when it comes to development. While I am glad that the draft Guidelines developed by the CEAA require the assessment of potential impacts on caribou from Cliffs Chromite project, the fact is that this assessment should be taking place on a broader scale, and it should consider the impacts from all anticipated development. This ad hoc approach to assessing development is doing a considerable disservice to the people of Canada, and to residents of the City of Greater Sudbury in particular, who may be on the hook to finance upgrades to service a ferrochrome production facility which may ultimately be bigger in scale and used longer than anticipated to simply service ore and concentrate from Cliffs Black Thor deposit. We don’t know what we’re getting ourselves into here, and the EA process contemplated in the draft Guidelines won’t provide clarity when it comes to actual anticipated impacts. A more comprehensive process which assesses the Ring of Fire in its entirety is therefore necessary ….”  Sourcealternate download site for entire letter (PDF)
  • Matawa is reportedly ramping up its internal communications campaign within its member communities.  “…. Matawa officials released a brochure they’ve sent to their communities to inform residents of northern reserves about the activities in their traditional territories with respect to the Ring of Fire. According to an email obtained by TB Newswatch, the brochure covers Matawa’s repeated attempts to communicate with the government about Cliffs Natural Resources Inc. and Noront Resources Ltd. projects and the request for a joint panel review environmental assessment and subsequent judicial review filed in federal court on Nov. 7, 2011. Matawa chiefs met with the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency and the Ministry of Northern Development and Mines on Oct. 20, and the following day withdrew their support of Ring of Fire development, stating a comprehensive study environmental assessment was “inadequate.” …. “The government is failing in this whole Ring of Fire and northern development initiative,” Marten Falls Chief Eli Moonias is quoted as saying in the brochure, which urges residents to talk to their community communications liaison officer or the Matawa Four Rivers Environmental Advisory Service ….”  Source
  • Meanwhile, Big Trout Lake is calling on the Government of Ontario to tell an exploration company to stop working on areas around where the First Nation says graves are located.  “The Chief of the Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuweg First Nation has fired off an angry letter the Minister of Natural Resources, demanding action to resolve the latest dispute involving KI’s traditional territory. The letter from Chief Donny Morris follows a breakdown in talks between the province and KI over on-going exploration work in the area by a company called God’s Lake Resources. KI leaders walked away after they said provincial representatives refused to provide assurances that exploration work would stop while the talks on a joint-panel environmental assessment continued. In the letter, Chief Morris said the exploration continues to pose a threat to sacred sites on the land, which is a concern that he said has been raised repeatedly. The chief warns Minister Rick Bartolucci that unless time and funding is provided to allow for proper mapping of such sites, the province risks another Platinex-type dispute.”  Source more more

More open source information (excerpts from information monitored 1-19 Nov 11 (PDF) here.  All information shared here in accordance with the Fair Dealing provisions (§29) of the Copyright Act.  We’re not responsible for the accuracy of the source material, and inclusion of material doesn’t mean endorsement.

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Ring of Fire News – 7 Nov 11

  • Thunder Bay the latest to make pilgrimage to Cleveland to convince Cliffs to build chromite smelter in northwestern Ontario  “…. Greenstone municipal leaders won’t be far behind this month when their Thunder Bay counterparts meet with Cliffs Natural Resources senior officials at the company’s head office. Like Thunder Bay, the rural municipality has decided to pull out all the stops late in the game and meet face-to-face with top Cliffs executives to try and convince them to locate a chromite processor at Exton, near Nakina. It’s the second time a Greenstone mayor has gon on a road trip to try and bolster the case to benefit from Cliffs’ planned Ring of Fire chromite mine. A date couldn’t be confirmed Thursday but former Ontario Energy minister George Smitherman is to accompany Greenstone Mayor Renald Beaulieu and CAO Roy Sinclair …. Thunder Bay Mayor Keith Hobbs, city manager Tim Commisso and newly-hired mining exploration specialist John Mason are to head to Cleveland on Nov. 16. “We have a compelling case, and if we don’t go (to Cleveland) we’re never going to get (the processor in Thunder Bay), Hobbs said Thursday. “But if we don’t get it, we will be supporting Greenstone’s bid to have it in Exton,” added Hobbs ….”  Source (PDF)

  • Cliffs Natural Resources holding public meeting in Thunder Bay this month on proposed chromite project  “…. Cliffs officials are to be in Thunder Bay on Nov. 14 for a public information session, the first time they have held a large forum about the project. The session is to take (place) at the Valhalla Inn, 4-8 pm.”  Source (PDF)

  • More information on Noront Resources’ Blackbird exploration site  “Noront Resources Ltd. is pleased to announce the results from an additional 16 holes at the Company’s 100% owned Blackbird chromite deposit …. Wes Hanson, CEO of Noront states: “Drilling at Blackbird has been completed and results returned to date indicate that the limits of the high grade chromite deposit have expanded to the north – northeast along strike as well as down dip. The Company believes that this will translate into a material increase in the chromite resource relative to the December 2009 estimate. The Company plans to update the chromite resource and complete a Preliminary Assessment by the second quarter of 2012.” Mr. Hanson adds: “The Company continues to operate two drills, both of which are testing anomalies identified by an ongoing, ground based, geophysical survey that is underway at the Eagle’s Nest Complex. Company geologists believe these anomalies may represent buried nickel sulphide mineralization that airborne surveys failed to highlight” …. Noront’s summer drill program was undertaken to increase the existing chromite resource. To date 47 holes (21,137 metres) have been drilled. Of the holes drilled to date, assays have been received on 31 holes ….”  Source

  • Analyst:  KWG Resources stock might “Favor Bears (this) Week”  “The recent share price action of KWG Resources Inc. leads to think about a possible bounce down as the company has no strong news and their stock tends to follow the established trading boundaries. KWG had a 4.7 million trading volume on Thursday paired with a share price advance of 18.75%. However, the action didn’t follow up on that and stock’s value has already started retracing back down. The price action is currently in line with the general downtrend and continues to follow the boundaries of an established price channel. Furthermore, despite the large increase in trading volume the intraday price action depicted a low liquidity rally, meaning there is no strong buying pressure. The most recent price advance was somewhat encouraged by news, but there was nothing material to them. On October 27 the company reported that a 12 thousand meter drilling program is underway on Big Daddy chromite deposit in the Ring of Fire property in Ontario. According to the press release the initial metallurgical testing and drilling should be completed during Q1 2012. KWG currently holds 28% interest in the claims explored. The company actually had cash issues for the last reported period but those should now be over as they sold 1% net smelter royalty interests in the Black Thor, Black Label and Big Daddy chromite deposits to Anglo Pacific Group PLC for $18 million in August.”  Source

  • Lakehead University economist Livio DiMatteo:  McGuinty Liberals may bend on Far North Act? “…. This is going to be a contentious issue though how much the provincial government is willing to backtrack on the legislation is open to debate. Given the messianic zeal with which the provincial Liberals have approached environmental and energy issues –even to the detriment of their electoral performance in this region – it is unlikely that they will retreat. Nevertheless, they may be open to modifications if not for the repeal of the legislation …. “  Source

  • What’s next for First Nations calling for joint panel environmental assessment for Ring of Fire projects?  “A group of nine First Nations calling for an enhanced environmental review of Cliffs Natural Resources’ proposed chromite mine project is mulling its options in the wake of what appears to be a mute response from the federal government. “The chiefs are going to be meeting to work on a strategy,” Matawa First Nations spokesman Jason Rasevych said Thursday from the group’s Thunder Bay office. On Oct. 21, Matawa gave the government a week to respond to its demand for the appointment of an independent review panel into Cliffs’ project in the Ring of Fire, about 500 kilometres north of Thunder Bay. Matawa hasn’t said what it will do if its demand isn’t met, but there has been speculation about the issuing of eviction notices and action in the courts. On Thursday, the chiefs flew to Ottawa to support a similar demand from the seven First Nations that comprise the Mushkegowuk group of remote reserves located to the east of the Ring of Fire belt. Both Matawa and Mushkegowuk argue that Cliffs’ project qualifies for a panel review because it has the potential to cause significant damage to the environment and constitute infringement on Aboriginal and treaty rights. The Ring of Fire “is in the heart of the boreal forest and the largest collection of intact wetlands in the world,” the groups say. The Municipality of Greenstone is formally backing Matawa’s call for a panel review ….”  Sourcemore

  • One of the “KI 6” hired by environmental group for watershed protection program.  “John Cutfeet, a Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug band member, has been hired as the new Aboriginal Watershed Program Coordinator (Anishinini’ow Niipii’ow Anokiinakun) for the Wildlands League. Wildlands League is a chapter of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, and is supporting First Nations directly with the new Aboriginal Watershed Coordinator to help protect river, lakes and wetlands in Canada’s far north. “A majority of First Nation communities do not have the resources or the capacity to begin to deal with the changes that are coming into their traditional territories,” Cutfeet said. “Wildlands League is committing more than 13 percent of its budget this year to providing support and capacity to advance watershed protection for the maintenance of healthy ecosystems. This means 13 percent of its budget is going directly to First Nations.” The role of the new Aboriginal Watershed Coordinator will be to develop culturally appropriate, community-based approaches to watershed stewardship in First Nation communities most often affected by water quality issues. “Communities in the far north do not always have the financial mans or the capacity to do the important work of protecting the environment. Wildlands League is taking the lead to begin to address this very important need,” Cutfeet said.”  Sourcemore


More open source information (excerpts from information monitored 1 Oct-4 Nov 11 (PDF) here.  All information shared here in accordance with the Fair Dealing provisions (§29) of the Copyright Act.  We’re not responsible for the accuracy of the source material, and inclusion of material doesn’t mean endorsement.

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Ring of Fire News – 8 Aug 11

If you don’t want to miss any posts, try subscribing by e-mail. It’s as easy as clicking on the “Sign me up!” button to your right. Enjoy!


Information shared here in accordance with the Fair Dealing provisions (§29) of the Copyright Act.  We’re not responsible for accuracy of original material, and inclusion of material doesn’t mean endorsement.


  • Northern Development, Mines & Forestry Minister Michael Gravelle on Ring of Fire in pre-provincial-election statement: “we are all hoping to see the first mine there possibly ready to open within five years, with a significant training program put into place now so that Aboriginal and Northern workers can get those good-paying jobs in the future ….”  (Source:  Statement, 4 Aug 11)
  • KWG sells off Ring of Fire smelter royalties to Anglo Pacific Group PLC…. “KWG Resources Inc. has completed the sale of net smelter royalty interests (“NSR”) in the Black Thor, Black Label and Big Daddy chromite deposits to Anglo Pacific Group PLC for US$18 million. Half of the purchase price has been received by KWG and the remaining 50% has been received by an escrow agent to be held in escrow for a period of three months as security for KWG’s indemnification obligations to the purchaser in connection with the transaction ….”  (Source:  KWG news release, 4 Aug 11)
  • …. or put another way:  “Anglo Pacific Group has bought 7207565 Canada Inc from KWG Resources Inc. for US$18m. 7207565 Canada Inc owns a 1% net smelter royalty interest in the Black Thor, Black Label and Big Daddy chromite deposits, owned and operated by Cliffs Natural Resources, in the Ring of Fire region of Northern Ontario, Canada. Cliffs Natural Resources is currently undertaking an environmental assessment for Black Thor as part of its project development plans, and once constructed anticipates the production of ore for both direct sale and integrated ferrochrome production. Cliffs has also announced a commitment to engage with First Nations communities affected by the development to ensure the creation of opportunities for enhanced social wellbeing and economic prospects for those communities ….”  (Source:  Anglo Pacific Group news release, 2 Aug 11)
  • Ring of Fire Resources getting out of McNugget property?  “Ring of Fire Resources Inc. announces that it has engaged IBK Capital Corp to divest its 36.75% interest in its McNugget JV Project for cash. Macdonald Mines Exploration Ltd. (“BMK”) has the remaining 63.25% interest in the project and is the operator ….”  (Source:  Ring of Fire Resources news release, 4 Aug 11)

Summary of more open source information and sources cited (1-4 Aug 11) also available here (PDF).

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Ring of Fire News, 2 Aug 11

NOTE:  If you don’t want to miss any posts, try subscribing by e-mail.
It’s as easy as clicking on the “Sign me up!” button to your right.  Enjoy!


The Ring of Fire News blog shares public information in accordance with the Fair Dealing provisions (§29) of the Copyright Act, and is not responsible for the accuracy of the original material.  Inclusion of material or sources here should not imply endorsement or otherwise by the Ring of Fire News blog.


  • KWG sells smelter royalties to raise some money  “TSX V-listed KWG Resources on Tuesday said it agreed to sell smelter royalties in three of its chrome deposits in Northern Ontario’s Ring of Fire to Anglo Pacific Group for $18-million.  KWG owns 28% of the Big Daddy chrome project, with US miner Cliffs Natural Resources owing the rest, and also held a 1% net smelter royalty on the Black Thor, Black Label and Big Daddy assets.  “The group anticipates that the royalties from these chromite deposits, the largest known deposits of chromite ore in North America, will provide long term cash flows and continuing revenue growth for shareholders,” London-based Anglo Pacific chairpserson Peter Boycott said.  Cliffs aims to complete a prefeasibility study on the Black Thor project by September, with a full feasibility due for completion late next year.  First production has been pencilled in for 2015 ….”  (Sources:  KWG news release, stockmarketwire.com and miningweekly.com, 2 Aug 11)
  • Latest quarterly results from CLF  “Cliffs Natural Resources Inc. today reported second-quarter results for the period ended June 30, 2011 . Consolidated revenues were up 52% for the second quarter to a record $1.8 billion, from $1.2 billion in the same quarter last year. Operating income for the second quarter was $617 million, an increase of 69% from the comparable quarter in 2010 …. The Company expects to incur the following growth-related cash outflows …. Approximately $45 million related to its chromite project in Ontario, Canada ….”  (Sources:  company  news release, quarterly report, 27 Jul 11)
  • Sudbury-area MPP:  Sudbury’s still a good place for a smelter (even if nobody else returns reporter’s calls)  “Cliffs Natural Resources of Cleveland has yet to decide where it will build a smelter to process chromite concentrate from its Ring of Fire properties in northwestern Ontario.  A promotional video on the Cliffs’ website about the company’s three chromite deposits in the zone (Black Thor, Black Label and Big Daddy), entitled Value Beneath the Surface, highlights Greater Sudbury as one of the four communities where an enclosed chromite electric arc furnace facility could be built ….  In February, Cliffs indicated in a report it was using Greater Sudbury as a “base case” for a chromite smelting facility and said the site was a “brownfield” or no longer in use piece of industrial land about 25 km from Capreol.  Sudbury Liberal MPP Rick Bartolucci said this week he wants to Cliffs set up the chromite processing facility in Ontario, his preferred site being the proposed location near Capreol.  “As a community, we are making a very, very attractive case why that mining plant should be started in Capreol,” he said.  When asked about the province’s higher hydro rates being a deterrent to Cliffs picking an Ontario site, Bartolucci said it would still make sense to build the facility in this province.  “We have put in place a very, very competitive tax structure that will see the costs offset by the incredible tax benefits the government offers,” he said.  The MPP said the Greater Sudbury Development Corporation is the lead player in the local push to land the processing plant in the Nickel Capital.  Neither Ian Wood, acting director of economic development at the city, nor Doug Nadorozny, the city’s chief administrative officer, could be reached for comment. Company officials could not be reached, either ….”  (Source:  Sudbury Star, 29 Jul 11)
  • Wildlands League, Noront to Ontario:  Help First Nations develop land use plans  “The Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society’s Wildlands League and Noront Resources Ltd. are coming together and urging the Ontario government to begin land use planning with First Nations communities within the Ring of Fire chromite deposit.  In a letter addressed to various government ministers, the public interest group Wildlands League and Canadian mining company Noront highlight the “urgent need” to develop and approve compressive land use plans that will protect First Nations’ land while preventing delays and missteps for mining companies developing in the area.  “What First Nations communities need to see is the options available to them and the cost and benefits of those options,” said Anna Baggio the director of conservation and land use planning at Wildlands League.  Land use agreements are part of the government’s Far North Act, which aims to protect 50 per cent of Northern land (225,000 kilometres) from development while providing stability for mining companies exploring and developing in Northern Ontario. Baggio said land use agreements with First Nations communities and should have been implemented last fall when the Far North Act was initially passed …. “What it is, is getting a plan and moving that plan forward. Time is of the essence and the sooner development happens the sooner we are able to develop projects that are socially and environmentally responsible,” said Noront Resources’ president and chief executive officer Wesley Hanson …. “There are some companies that have not come to the table to sign exploration agreements, but more are becoming aware now,” said Webequie’s head band councillor Elcie MacDonald. “Nothing is going to come out of it unless they sign the exploration agreement.” …. Noront Resources and the Wildlands League said that without a plan to replace land use agreements, the path to responsibly and effectively developing Ring of Fire could be damaged.  “The First Nations knowledge is vital to consider in any type of infrastructure development because they have traditional areas that would impact them and knowing those areas in advance and being able to plan out development without impacting the traditional way of life of life in communities,” said (Noront CEO Wes) Hanson.  Baggio said the letter has yet to prompt a response from the government, but she does expect that the Ministers will respond.”  (Source:  Kenora Daily Miner & News, 27 Jul 11)

Summary of more open source information and sources cited (1 Jul – 2 Aug 11) also available here (PDF).

Filed under: Uncategorized, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 759 other followers

Follow me on Twitter